Seizure Management
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Seizure Management in the Emergency Department (Pharmacology CME)
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Seizure Management in the Emergency Department (Pharmacology CME) -
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Seizures are a common presentation in the emergency department, representing up to 1% of visits to the adult ED and 2% of visits to the pediatric ED. Seizures have a wide differential and can have subtle presentations, so emergency clinicians must look for key clinical clues and utilize appropriate diagnostic studies when evaluating patients who present with seizures. This multimedia resource provides an overview of the management of seizures in the ED, including the current evidence on pharmacologic management of seizures, and provides in-depth reviews of nonconvulsive status epilepticus and seizures in neonates. It includes 8.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Included as part of the 8.5 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 5.5 Pharmacology CME credits. CME expires on 10/31/22.

Included in this program:

  1. Two evidence-based courses delivered in online formats, reviewing the management of nonconvulsive status epilepticus in adults, and seizures in neonates.
  2. A video session recorded at the 2020 Clinical Decision Making in Emergency Medicine conference presenting a case-based review of the management of seizures in the emergency department.
  3. 8.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, including 5.5 pharmacology credits

Video Excerpt

Modules

Course 1: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated

Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the ED setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology. Benzodiazepines are the mainstay of first-line therapy, with antiepileptic drugs and anesthetics as second- and third-line therapies, respectively. The objective of this comprehensive review is to establish a standardized evidence-based protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of NCSE.

CME Credits: 4 (includes 3 Pharmacology credits)

Course 2: Seizures in Neonates: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department

Neonatal seizures are associated with high morbidity and mortality, but they can be difficult to diagnose because they often present with subtle signs and symptoms. Initial management goals in the ED include patient stabilization, seizure cessation, and determination of the etiology. This course reviews common presentations and causes of neonatal seizures, considerations for ED management, and the evidence regarding antiepileptic medications for neonates.

CME Credits: 4 (includes 2 Pharmacology credits)

Video: Seizure Management in the Emergency Department

In this video, Andy Jagoda, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, presents an overview of the management of seizures in the ED. Following a brief review of seizure classifications, Dr. Jagoda utilizes case presentations to explore evaluation and diagnostic strategies for various types of seizures and discusses the current evidence regarding pharmacologic treatment options.

Video length: 33 minutes

CME Credits: 0.5 (includes 0.5 Pharmacology credits)

Product Details:

Publication Date: October 1, 2020

CME Expiration Date: October 31, 2022

CME Information: Included as part of the 8.5 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 5 Pharmacology CME credits, subject to your state and institutional approval. Accreditation: EB Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the ACCME. Credit Designation: EB Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 8.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The Seizure Management in the Emergency Department course is eligible for 8 Category 2-A or 2-B credit hours by the American Osteopathic Association. The “Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated” journal issue of Seizure Management in the Emergency Department is approved by the American College of Emergency Physicians for 4 Category I credits. The “Seizures in Neonates: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department” journal issue of Seizure Management in the Emergency Department is approved by the American College of Emergency Physicians for 4 Category I credits, and has been reviewed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and is acceptable for 4 AAP credits.

Customer Comments

Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated:

  • Paul P., MD: “Good reminder of a condition that likely occurs in a higher % of patients than thought.”
  • Romeo R., MD: “Excellent choice of topic and presentations that are practical and clear to follow.”
  • Gordon R., MD: “Excellent discussion of an under-recognized entity.”
  • Clay R., MD: “I am more clinically aware of NCSE now, and will regularly include this in my differential. I am also aware of the stepwise approach to treating this condition if encountered. Great article that will change my practice.”
  • Vincent G., PA-C: “This was a topic I was not familiar with and I learned a lot from it. I will now be more aware of including NCSE in my differential diagnosis with patients presenting with AMS and looking for clues in the physical exam, and especially on re-examination, that may usually be overlooked.”
  • Jeffrey D., MD: “Good review of a complex subject.”

Seizures in Neonates: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department

  • Luke R. DO: “Great review of topic rarely discussed.”
  • Charles N., MD: “A rather extensive differential involved, but the description of acute management was made reasonable....well done!”
  • Patrick M., MD: “Great topic and article! Very useful!”
  • Audrey S., PA-C: “More aware of signs of seizure in neonates that appear to be other normal activity. Will maintain higher level of suspicion for neonatal seizure.”

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