Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Improving Outcomes in the Emergency Department With Aggressive Management Strategies - Pharmacology EXTRA Supplement - (Pharmacology CME) | Digest
0
TOC Will Appear Here

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Improving Outcomes in the Emergency Department With Aggressive Management Strategies - Pharmacology EXTRA Supplement - (Pharmacology CME)

10,962 views
Below is a free preview. Log in or subscribe for full access. Or, get a free sample article Emergency Department Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in the Nonpregnant Patient:
Please provide a valid email address.

Points & Pearls Excerpt

  • After assessing ABCs, management of AWS begins with an assessment of the severity of the alcohol withdrawal. The presence of tachycardia, hypertension, diaphoresis, agitation, and/or seizure activity (or history) suggests severe withdrawal.
  • Obtaining an ethanol level is recommended, as severe alcohol intoxication can mimic alcohol withdrawal in some individuals. Individuals who have alcohol withdrawal with an elevated ethanol level are more likely to develop severe AWS.
  • Benzodiazepines are first-line medications for management of most cases of mild, moderate, and severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms; no other drug class has been shown to be superior.
  • Diazepam’s clinical effects occur in 1 to 5 minutes, with a long half-life of 48 hours and active metabolites, including nordiazepam and oxazepam, that extend the duration of the desired sedative effects.
  • For AWS refractory to 200 mg of diazepam in 4 hours or AWS requiring a single dose of diazepam ≥40 mg, escalating the dosing every 15 minutes is recommended and supported by case-control literature.
To Read The Companion Article:
To Read The Companion Article:
To Read The Companion Article:
Already purchased this course?
Log in to read.
Purchase a subscription

Price: $449/year

140+ Credits!

Purchase Issue & CME Test

Price: $99

+4 Credits!

Money-back Guarantee
Publication Information
Authors

Joseph Yanta, MD, FACEP; Greg Swartzentruber, MD; Anthony Pizon, MD, FACMT

Peer Reviewed By

Gillian Beauchamp, MD, FASAM

Publication Date

March 15, 2021

CME Expiration Date

March 15, 2024

CME Credits

4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits.
Specialty CME Credits: Included as part of the 4 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 4 Pharmacology CME credits, subject to your state and institutional approval.

Get Permission

CME Information

Content You Might Be Interested In

Sedative-Hypnotic Drug Withdrawal Syndrome: Recognition and Treatment

Get A Sample Issue Of Emergency Medicine Practice
Enter your email to get your copy today! Plus receive updates on EB Medicine every month.
Please provide a valid email address.