Lead Poisoning in Children: Emergency Department Recognition and Management (Pharmacology CME) | Points & Pearls
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Lead Poisoning in Children: Emergency Department Recognition and Management (Pharmacology CME)

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  • Identifying a child with severe lead poisoning can be challenging, as it is an uncommon entity with a nonspecific presentation and there is often lack of a known lead exposure.
  • Patients may be asymptomatic or present with nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms, unexplained neurologic findings, signs of anemia, and/or hypertension. Maintain a high index of suspicion for lead poisoning in patients presenting with these symptoms and no known cause.
  • If there is suspicion for lead poisoning, obtain a comprehensive history to identify possible risk factors for lead exposure. (See Table 1.)
  • When assessing a patient for lead poisoning, it is not necessary to order lead testing of urine, hair, teeth, or fingernails, since these tests are not as sensitive or specific;45-47 a BLL is sufficient to make the diagnosis.
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Publication Information
Authors

Ariella Nadler, MD

Peer Reviewed By

Sing-Yi Feng, MD, FAAP; Michael Levine, MD

Publication Date

April 2, 2022

CME Expiration Date

April 2, 2025

Pub Med ID: 35315605

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