Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess: Recognition and Management in the Emergency Department | Points & Pearls
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Pediatric Spinal Epidural Abscess: Recognition and Management in the Emergency Department

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  • Fever, back pain, and neurologic symptoms are the classic triad of a spinal epidural abscess (SEA), but this presentation is seen in <10% of cases.35 Young children may present with variable symptoms such as abdominal pain or failure to bear weight.
  • Neurologic deficits are an indicator of severe, progressed disease, but they may not be present in the early stages. Lack of neurologic symptoms does not rule out SEA.
  • SEA has a very rapid progression of disease. Patients can progress rapidly from a normal neurologic examination to signs of paralysis within 12 to 48 hours.
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Publication Information
Authors

Bahareh Ravandi, MD; Christine S. Cho, MD, MPH, MEd

Peer Reviewed By

Winnie Whitaker, MD; Amy Z. Zhou, MD, PhD

Publication Date

June 2, 2022

CME Expiration Date

July 2, 2025

Pub Med ID: 35613376

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