Seizures in Neonates: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department (Pharmacology CME) | Digest
0
TOC Will Appear Here

Seizures in Neonates: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department (Pharmacology CME)

4,429 views
Below is a free preview. Log in or subscribe for full access. Or, get a free sample article ED Assessment and Management of Pediatric Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion:
Please provide a valid email address.

Points & Pearls Excerpt

  • Compared to seizures in older children, neonatal seizures can be subtle and difficult to diagnose, leading to higher mortality, worse prognosis, and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae.
  • The leading causes of neonatal seizures are hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy from birth trauma, vascular disorders, infections, and acquired metabolic derangements. Brain malformations, inherited seizure disorders, drug sequelae, and kernicterus can also lead to seizures.
  • The age of the neonate at the time of seizure presentation can aid in determining etiology, as can maternal, perinatal, and feeding histories. Physical examination findings such as macrocephaly, bulging fontanelle, facial dysmorphisms, organomegaly, congenital rashes, skin lesions, and myoclonus can also aid in diagnosis.
  • Seizures in neonates are most often focal, with abnormal eye movements as the most common manifestation. Focal tonic-clonic extremity movements, arm or leg pedaling movements, tongue thrusting, and lip-smacking can also be presenting signs.
  • Treatable causes of seizures include derangements in glucose, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and pyridoxine. Hyponatremia should be corrected slowly to decrease risk of pontine demyelination syndrome.

Most Important References

To Read The Companion Article:
To Read The Companion Article:
To Read The Companion Article:
Already purchased this course?
Log in to read.
Purchase a subscription

Price: $449/year

140+ Credits!

Purchase Issue & CME Test

Price: $59

+4 Credits!

Money-back Guarantee
Publication Information
Authors

Melissa L. Langhan, MD, MHS, FAAP; Brielle Stanton, MD

Peer Reviewed By

Nicole Gerber, MD; Quyen Luc, MD

Publication Date

June 2, 2020

CME Expiration Date

July 3, 2023

CME Credits

4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, 4 ACEP Category I Credits, 4 AAP Prescribed Credits, 4 AOA Category 2-A or 2-B Credits.
Specialty CME Credits: Included as part of the 4 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 2 Pharmacology CME credits

Pub Med ID: 32470245

Get Permission

CME Information

Content You Might Be Interested In

Pediatric Stroke: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department - Stroke EXTRA Supplement (Stroke CME and Pharmacology CME)

Pediatric Stroke: Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department (Stroke CME and Pharmacology CME)

Emergency Department Management Of Seizures In Pediatric Patients

Get A Sample Issue Of Emergency Medicine Practice
Enter your email to get your copy today! Plus receive updates on EB Medicine every month.
Please provide a valid email address.