Management of Suspected Rabies Exposure in the Emergency Department (Infectious Disease CME) | Points & Pearls
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Management of Suspected Rabies Exposure in the Emergency Department (Infectious Disease CME)

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Points & Pearls Excerpt

  • Worldwide, more than 95% of cases of rabies occur in Africa and Asia, with 35% in India alone. 99% of cases are from dog bites.
  • The canine virus strain of rabies was eradicated in the U.S. in 2004, though rarely, dogs can acquire other strains from contact with wildlife.
  • In the U.S., rabies is endemic in wild mammals, including foxes, coyotes, skunks, raccoons, and bats. Small rodents are rarely infected.
  • In the U.S. from 1960 to 2018, 70% of cases of rabies were attributed to bats.
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Publication Information
Authors

Bess Storch, MD

Peer Reviewed By

Jason Chu, MD; Edward Otten, MD, FACMT, FAWM

Publication Date

April 1, 2021

CME Expiration Date

April 1, 2024

CME Credits

4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, 4 ACEP Category I Credits, 4 AAFP Prescribed Credits, 4 AOA Category 2-A or 2-B Credits.
Specialty CME Credits: Included as part of the 4 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 4 Infectious Disease CME credits

Pub Med ID: 33779128

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