An Evidence-based Approach to Nontraumatic Ocular Complaints in Children (Infectious Disease CME credit and Pharmacology CME) | Store
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An Evidence-Based Approach to Nontraumatic Ocular Complaints in Children (Infectious Disease CME and Pharmacology CME) -
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An Evidence-Based Approach to Nontraumatic Ocular Complaints in Children (Infectious Disease CME and Pharmacology CME)
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Publication Date: February 2021 (Volume 18, Number 02)

CME Credits: 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, 4 ACEP Category I Credits, 4 AAP Prescribed Credits, 4 AOA Category 2-A or 2-B Credits. CME expires 02/01/2024.

Specialty CME Credits: Included as part of the 4 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 1 Infectious Disease CME and 0.25 Pharmacology CME credits, subject to your state and institutional approval.

Authors

Ammarah Iqbal, MD, MPH
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, Pediatric Emergency Department, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT
Melissa L. Langhan, MD, MHS, FAAP
Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine; Fellowship Director, Director of Education, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Jill Rotruck, MD
Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Gauthami Soma, MD
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, Pediatric Emergency Department, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT

Peer Reviewers

Marni Kriegel, MD
Attending Physician, Pediatric Emergency Department, Hackensack University Medical Center; Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, Clifton, NJ
Jennifer E. Sanders, MD, FAAP, FACEP
Assistant Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine, and Education, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY

Abstract

Children commonly present to emergency departments with eye complaints in the absence of antecedent trauma. Signs and symptoms of ocular disease are often nonspecific. Red, swollen, or painful eyes may represent benign or vision-threatening processes, making recognition and triage challenging for the emergency clinician. This issue reviews the presentations of common nontraumatic ocular complaints and provides evidence-based recommendations for management in the emergency department.

Excerpt From This Issue

CASE 1
A 6-year-old boy with autism is brought to the ED for swelling of his right eye…
  • His mother tells you that he has had thick nasal discharge for the past week and has developed progressive redness and fullness of his right eye. He is cranky and holding his head in pain.
  • The boy's vital signs are: temperature, 39°C (102.2°F); heart rate, 135 beats/min; respiratory rate, 25 breaths/min; blood pressure, 100/80 mm Hg; and oxygen saturation, 98% on room air. Your examination reveals a tired child with swelling and redness around the right eye. The patient refuses to open his eyes, and you are unable to perform an ocular examination. The boy’s nasal turbinates are swollen.
  • You consider both periorbital and orbital cellulitis in your differential diagnosis and wonder whether the boy needs emergent imaging.

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