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Optimizing Emergency Management to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality in Pediatric Burn Patients (Trauma CME) -
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Optimizing Emergency Management to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality in Pediatric Burn Patients (Trauma CME)
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Publication Date: June 2020 (Volume 17, Supplement 6-2)

CME Credits: 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. CME expires 006/30/2023. This course is included with an Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice subscription

Specialty CME Credits: Included as part of the 4 credits, this CME activity is eligible for 4 Trauma CME credits, subject to your state and institutional approval.

Authors

Hilary Fairbrother, MD, MPH, FACEP
Vice Chair of Education, Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX
 
Megan Long, MD
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX
 
Elizabeth Haines, DO, MAS, FACEP
Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine at NYU Langone Health; Director of Safety and Quality, Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital, New York, NY
 

Peer Reviewer

Melissa L. Langhan, MD, MHS, FAAP
Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine; Fellowship Director, Director of Education, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
 

Abstract

Burns are a significant cause of injury-induced morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. The spectrum of management for pediatric burn victims is vast and relies heavily on both the classification of the burn and the body systems involved. The immediate focus of management includes resuscitation and stabilization, fluid management, and pain control. Additional focus includes decreasing the risk of infection as well as improving healing and cosmetic outcomes. Discharge care and appropriate follow-up instructions need to be communicated carefully in order to avoid long-standing complications. This supplement reviews methods for accurate classification and management of the full range of burns seen in pediatric patients.

Excerpt From This Issue

Thermal burns in pediatric patients are frequently seen in the practice of the emergency clinician. Approximately 1% of all annual United States ED visits are due to burns,and burns in patients aged < 14 years are consistently among the top causes of injury-induced mortality.2 When compared to outcomes in adult burn patients, burns in pediatric patients carry a disproportionately higher morbidity. The majority of burns occur in children aged < 5 years, with a peak incidence at 1 year of age.3

Most pediatric burns occur as a result of accidents in the home.4 The majority of pediatric burns are due to scald injuries, a burn caused by hot liquids spilling onto the skin. Scalds and contact burns from sources such as stoves and hot irons together account for 85% of burns seen by emergency clinicians.5

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