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<< Diagnosis And Management Of North American Snake And Scorpion Envenomations

Prehospital Care

As with Crotalid envenomations, there are no specific prehospital interventions for scorpion or non- Crotalid snake envenomations, other than removal from danger, and rapid, safe transport. Immobilization of the affected limb may be helpful. An interesting experiment testing a novel immobilization technique in a porcine model of a coral snake envenomation has been published.8 The pressure- immobilization technique is not a tourniquet, but uses an elastic bandage applied from the envenomation site and extended proximally. The goal is to impede lymphatic flow, not venous or arterial flow. Apply the bandage about as tight as a wrap for an acute sprain, yet loose enough to allow a finger to be inserted between skin and bandage without difficulty.

Also, splint the limb to limit motion. Elapid snakebites in other countries, primarily Australia, aretreated with a similar pressure immobilization technique. 54-55 Because of the low quality evidence, this technique must be considered experimental, even though it has been included in a clinical guideline for the snakebite section of an emergency care guideline, the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science with Treatment Recommendations.11

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Last Modified: 06/27/2017
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