Risk Management Pitfalls for Management of Children With Stridor | Management of Airway Obstruction and Stridor in Pediatric Patients
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Risk Management Pitfalls for Management of Children With Stridor

1. “We must start an IV and get labs now!”

Children with stridor should be left in positions of comfort, with as little manipulation as possible. Agitating the patient with supplemental oxygen, unnecessary intravenous access, and blood work can lead to worsening respiratory distress; these interventions should be reserved for patients who require parenteral therapy or are deteriorating after history and physical examination.

2. “I didn't want to waste time observing a patient with stridor.”

Observation is important in guiding initial management and can provide a significant amount of information almost immediately. Watching for increased work of breathing and drooling after placing the patient in a position of comfort can determine necessary initial interventions.

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Last Modified: 01/17/2019
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