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<< Sickle Cell Disease: A Comprehensive Review Of Inpatient Management

Case Presentations and Conclusion

A 28-year-old man with a history of homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS) presents to the emergency department with severe pain. He said he has had 6 pain crisis episodes requiring hospitalization in the last year, but that he takes no medications at home. He is admitted for severe pain of his chest, ribs, and legs, but he is hemodynamically stable. An initial diagnosis of acute pain crisis is made and he is treated with intravenous analgesics. Forty-eight hours later, he develops new complaints of cough and shortness of breath. His temperature is 38.6C°, and pulse oximetry on room air is 89%. A chest x-ray reveals a new left lower lobe infiltrate compared to imaging done at admission. What complication has he developed? How would you treat him?

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Last Modified: 07/23/2017
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