Risk Management Pitfalls For Hypertension In The Emergency Department: An Evidence-Based Approach To Managing Asymptomatic Elevated Blood Pressure in the ED
0

<< An Evidence-Based Approach To Managing Asymptomatic Elevated Blood Pressure In The Emergency Department

Risk Management Pitfalls For Hypertension In The Emergency Department

1. “I aggressively treat all patients with elevated blood pressure initially, and then decide who needs to be admitted or discharged based on their response to therapy.”
It is wise to tailor diagnostic and management strategies to the individual patient and to distinguish patients with asymptomatic elevated blood pressure from those presenting with symptoms that are suggestive of end-organ damage or hypertensive emergency. While the former need a blood pressure recheck in days to weeks, the latter may need parenteral therapy and admission (frequently to the intensive care unit setting). Also, blood pressure that is elevated on initial triage measure may decrease without an intervention on recheck. While patients with asymptomatic elevation of blood pressure have a low likelihood of shortterm decompensation, those with hypertensive emergency need parenteral therapy to prevent potentially fatal acute end-organ damage.107

To continue reading, please log in or purchase access.

Already purchased this course?
Log in to read.
Purchase a subscription

Price: $449/year

140+ Credits!

Money-back Guarantee
Get A Sample Issue Of Emergency Medicine Practice
Enter your email to get your copy today! Plus receive updates on EB Medicine every month.
Please provide a valid email address.