Emergency Department Evaluation And Management Of Blunt Chest And Lung Trauma (Trauma CME)
×
EMPOWERING PHYSICIANS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED CONTENT
 

Home > EB Store > Emergency Department Evaluation And Management Of Blunt Chest And Lung Trauma (Trauma CME)

Emergency Department Evaluation And Management Of Blunt Chest And Lung Trauma (Trauma CME), Emergency Medicine Practice evidence-based CME
Enlarge Image
Delivery Method:

Emergency Department Evaluation And Management Of Blunt Chest And Lung Trauma (Trauma CME) - $39.00

Publication Date: June 2016 (Volume 18, Number 6)

CME: This issue includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™; 4 ACEP Category I credits; 4 AAFP Prescribed credits; and 4 AOA Category 2 A or 2B CME credits.

Authors
 
Eric J. Morley, MD, MS 
Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, Associate Residency Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 
 
Scott Johnson, MD 
Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, Residency Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 
 
Evan Leibner, MD, PhD 
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 
 
Jawad Shahid, MD 
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 
 
Peer Reviewers
 
Ram Parekh, MD 
Assistant Clinical Professor, Emergency Department, Elmhurst Hospital Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 
 
Christopher R. Tainter, MD, RDMS 
Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA
 
Emergency Trauma Care Current Topics And Controversies, Vol I (Trauma CME)
 
Abstract
 
The majority of blunt chest injuries are minor contusions or abrasions; however, life-threatening injuries, including tension pneumothorax, hemothorax, and aortic rupture can occur and must be recognized early. This review focuses on the diagnosis, management, and disposition of patients with blunt injuries to the ribs and lung. Utilization of decision rules for chest x-ray and computed tomography are discussed, along with the emerging role of bedside lung ultrasonography. Management controversies presented include the limitations of needle thoracostomy us­ing standard needle, chest tube placement, and chest tube size. Finally, a discussion is provided related to airway and ventilation management to assist in the timing and type of interventions needed to maintain oxygenation.

Excerpt From This Issue

Traumatic injuries continue to be a major health concern in the United States. Unintentional injuries have become the fourth leading cause of death, now exceeding stroke.1 Trauma is also the leading cause of death, morbidity, hospitalization, and disability in Americans aged 1 year to 45 years. Blunt chest injuries are a particular concern, occurring in 12 persons per 1 million per day, with approximately one-third requiring hospital admission. Blunt thoracic traumatic injuries are responsible for 20% to 25% of all blunt trauma deaths.2
 

Product Reviews
Francisco L. L - 09/03/2018
This is excellent Trauma CME!

100% Money-Back Gurantee

 
About EB Medicine:
Products:
Accredited By:
ACCME ACCME
AMA AMA
ACEP ACEP
AAFP AAFP
AOA AOA
AAP AAP
Endorsed By:
AEMAA AEMAA
HONcode HONcode
STM STM

 

Last Modified: 12/17/2018
© EB Medicine