Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Complications In Children: An Evidence-Based Approach To Emergency Department Management
×
EMPOWERING PHYSICIANS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED CONTENT
 

Home > EB Store > Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Complications In Children: An Evidence-Based Approach To Emergency Department Management

Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Complications In Children: An Evidence-Based Approach To Emergency Department Management
Enlarge Image
Delivery Method:

Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Complications In Children: An Evidence-Based Approach To Emergency Department Management - $39.00

Publication Date

Feburary 2016 (Volume 13, Number 2)

CME

This issue includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, 4 ACEP Category I credits, 4 AAP Prescribed credits, and 4 AOA Category 2A or 2B credits.

Authors
 
Jacqueline Bober, DO, FAAP
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
 
Jonathan Rochlin, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
 
Shashidhar Marneni, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
 
Peer Reviewers
 
Joel M. Clingenpeel, MD, MPH, FAAP, FAAEM
Associate Professor, Pediatrics; Fellowship Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA
 
Tommy Y. Kim, MD, FAAP, FACEP
Associate Professor, Loma Linda University Medical Center and Children's Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Loma Linda, CA; Riverside Community Hospital, CEP, Riverside, CA

Abstract

Although much is known about ventriculoperitoneal shunts, there are still large gaps in the literature and no evidence-based guidelines on management. To date, there is no general consensus on workup and treatment, and there are many differing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for management of complications. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt complications can be separated into 3 categories: mechanical failure, infection, and functional failure. Knowing the basic anatomy of ventriculoperitoneal shunts, the time of shunt placement, and the clinical manifestations suggestive of potential complications can help with the management of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts. This review summarizes the literature on complications of ventriculoperitoneal shunts, examines the literature regarding the workup and management of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts, and makes recommendations for the management of these patients in the emergency department.

Excerpt From This Issue

A 7-year-old girl with a history of a VP shunt presents with a headache for 2 days and worsening fever. The patient’s mother states that the child had a shunt placed during her first year of life for congenital aqueductal stenosis. The patient is febrile in the ED, with a temperature of 38.6°C, but is nontoxic. Her other vital signs are: heart rate, 118 beats/min; respiratory rate, 20 breaths/min; blood pressure 98/62 mm Hg; and oxygen saturation, 100% on room air. Her physical examination is unremarkable except for a mildly erythematous throat. What are important points on your history that should be elicited for a patient with a VP shunt and fever? If you are concerned about a VP shunt infection, what laboratory studies should be ordered? Do you need to order any imaging studies to look for a possible shunt malfunction? Should you call this child’s neurosurgeon?

100% Money-Back Gurantee

 
About EB Medicine:
Products:
Accredited By:
ACCME ACCME
AMA AMA
ACEP ACEP
AAFP AAFP
AOA AOA
AAP AAP
Endorsed By:
AEMAA AEMAA
HONcode HONcode
STM STM

 

Last Modified: 12/17/2018
© EB Medicine