EMPOWERING PHYSICIANS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED CONTENT
 

Home > EB Store > Ocular Injuries: New Strategies In Emergency Department Management (Trauma CME)

Ocular Injuries: New Strategies In Emergency Department Management (Trauma CME)
Enlarge Image
Delivery Method:

Ocular Injuries: New Strategies In Emergency Department Management (Trauma CME) - $39.00

Publication Date

November 2015 (Volume 17, Number 11)

CME

This issue includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM; 4 ACEP Category I credits; 4 AAFP Prescribed credits; and 4 AOA Category 2A or 2B CME credits.

Author
 
Anne M. Messman, MD
Assistant Program Director, Assistant Professor, Sinai-Grace Emergency Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
 
Peer Reviewers
 
Edmond A. Hooker, MD, DrPH
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
 
Nadia Shaukat, MD, RDMS
Associate Director, Associate Fellowship Director, Emergency Ultrasound Division, Department of Emergency Medicine, New York Presbyterian Queens, Flushing, NY
 
Abstract

Ocular injuries are common in the emergency department, and they are the most frequent cause of noncongenital monocular blindness in children and adults. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and disposition of patients with all types of ocular trauma, including pain management, the use of antibiotics, cycloplegics, steroids, antifibrinolytics, and patching. Bedside ocular ultrasound has profoundly expanded diagnostic capability, particularly for the multiply injured patient, and routine management and disposition of patients with corneal abrasions has evolved significantly as well. Diagnosis and management of patients with retrobulbar hemorrhage is discussed in detail, with resources for performing vision-saving lateral canthotomy. Systematic evaluation and management of ocular trauma patients will ensure these patients have the best chance for a favorable final visual outcome.

Excerpt From This Issue

Your shift begins and you pick up your first chart: “eye irritation.” You talk to the patient and discover that she felt the sudden onset of left eye pain and irritation while she was applying her eye makeup this morning; she is worried she may have scratched her eye with her fingernail. You give the patient's eye a drop of topical anesthetic and perform a fluorescein examination, which reveals a single corneal abrasion. You plan to discharge the patient home with a prescription for a topical antibiotic and a topical cycloplegic. The patient asks if she can have the bottle of topical anesthetic because it was so helpful in relieving her pain. You wonder whether this is safe...

100% Money-Back Gurantee

 

About EB Medicine:

Products:

Accredited By:

ACCME ACCME
AMA AMA
ACEP ACEP
AAFP AAFP
AOA AOA
AAP AAP

Endorsed By:

AEMAA AEMAA
HONcode HONcode
STM STM

 

Last Modified: 07/23/2017
© EB Medicine