Pediatric Emergency Transport: Communication and Coordination Are Key to Improving Outcomes
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Pediatric Emergency Transport: Communication and Coordination Are Key to Improving Outcomes
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Pediatric Emergency Transport: Communication and Coordination Are Key to Improving Outcomes - $39.00

Publication Date: April 2018 (Volume 15, Number 4)

CME: This issue includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™; 4 ACEP Category I credits; 4 AAP Prescribed credits; and 4 AOA Category 2-A or 2-B CME credits. CME expires 04/01/2021.

Authors

Abraham Gallegos, MD
Attending Physician, Department of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
 
Vijay Prasad, MD, MPH
Attending Physician, Department of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
 
Calvin G. Lowe, MD, FAAP
Medical Director, Alan Purwin Emergency Transport Program; Attending Physician, Division of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
 
Peer Reviewers
 
Stephen Patterson, MD, FACEP
Assistant Medical Director/EMS Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Riverside Community Hospital/UCR EM Residency, Riverside, CA
 
Kristy Williamson, MD, FAAP
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park, NY
 
Abstract
 
Pediatric patients who are critically ill or who require urgent subspecialty evaluation or specialized imaging, equipment, or procedures must often be transferred to tertiary care centers. The safe execution of interfacility transfer requires the coordination between the facility healthcare teams at each end of the transfer as well as the transport team. This issue discusses the process of interfacility transfer, the required services, the role of the emergency clinician, the role of the pediatric transport team, and the commonly used diagnostic studies and treatment needed during interfacility transfers of pediatric patients.
 
Excerpt From This Issue

A 10-year-old boy presents to your community ED complaining of nausea, vomiting, and “side pain” for 1 day. In the last few hours, he has had shortness of breath and chest pain. His mother states that the boy has had increased thirst and urination for about the last month, which she attributed to the exceptionally hot weather in their desert community. While you consider a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis, the boy’s mental status begins to deteriorate, and he quickly progresses from confusion to agitation. As you get ready to sedate and treat this patient, you also recognize the need for pediatric critical care and endocrinology—subspecialties available only at the tertiary care children’s hospital 100 miles away. How do you decide on the appropriate level of transport care for this critically ill and unstable patient?

 

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Last Modified: 12/18/2018
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