Mammalian Bites In The Emergency Department: Recommendations For Wound Closure, Antibiotics, And Postexposure Prophylaxis (Trauma CME)
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Mammalian Bites In The Emergency Department: Recommendations For Wound Closure, Antibiotics, And Postexposure Prophylaxis (Trauma CME) - $39.00

Publication Date: April 2016 (Volume 18, Number 4)

CME: This issue includes 4 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™; 4 ACEP Category I credits; 4 AAFP Prescribed credits; and 4 AOA Category 2 A or 2B CME credits.

Authors
 
Mary Ann Edens, MD, FACEP
Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, Shreveport, LA
 
Jose A. Michel, MD, MS
Department of Emergency Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, Shreveport, LA
 
Nathaniel Jones, MD
Department of Emergency Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport, Shreveport, LA
 
Peer Reviewers
 
Jennifer Galjour, MD, MPH
Attending Physician, City MD, New York, NY
 
Alex Koyfman, MD, FAAEM
Clinical Assistant Professor, Attending Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, TX
 
Emergency Trauma Care Current Topics And Controversies, Vol I (Trauma CME)
 
Abstract
 
Half of all Americans will experience a mammalian bite at some time in their life, and the cost of caring for these injuries has reached $160 million annually. Emergency clinicians must consider many factors when making decisions regarding care of these injuries: risk of infection, cost of antibiotics, time of wound healing, cosmetic and functional result, and risk of other injuries or diseases. Knowledge of the current literature and practice guidelines facilitates care for these injuries in the most cost-effective and clinically sound manner. This systematic review provides best-practice recommendations based on the best available evidence.
 

Excerpt From This Issue

The incidence of mammalian bites is difficult to determine because a large number of these bites are never reported. Analysis of results from a telephone survey estimated that some 4.5 million dog bites occurred annually in the United States, with approximately 20% of those patients seeking medical treatment.1 The cost of healthcare associated with these injuries has risen dramatically over the years, with one report estimating that it exceeds $160 million annually.2 It is estimated that animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department (ED) visits each year.

 
The majority of bite wounds can be attributed to dogs, cats, and humans, with dog bites constituting
about 80% of reported wounds. A small percentage of wounds are inflicted by other mammals, and these
wounds are often a larger concern to the general public due to unfamiliarity with their treatment. In
this issue of Emergency Medicine Practice, we take an in-depth look at the management of mammalian-bite
wounds, including the timing of wound closure, the use of prophylactic antibiotics, and the latest recommendations for rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP).

 

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Last Modified: 12/18/2018
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