Test Your Knowledge: Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies
August 3, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

When medical emergencies arise in flight, commercial airline flight crews may ask for help from onboard medical professionals. Qualified, active, licensed, and sober providers should volunteer to assist in the event of a medical emergency rather than decline out of fear of medicolegal reprisal. An understanding of the typically available resources, the hierarchy of authority, and medico-legal precedents can help providers feel confident in responding to these situations.  read more

Test Your Knowledge: Acid-Base Disturbances
June 29, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Acid-base disturbances are physiological responses to a wide variety of underlying conditions and critical illnesses. Homeo-stasis of acid-base physiology is complex and interdependent with the function of the lungs, kidneys, and endogenous buffer systems. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Mechanical Ventilation Management in the Emergency Department
June 22, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 1 comment so far

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check to see if you got last month’s case on Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach right. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach
May 29, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , add a comment

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case, on Novel 2019 Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19): An Updated Overview for Emergency Clinicians right. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Identification and Management of Marine Envenomations in Pediatric Patients
March 25, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 2 comments

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

Case Presentation: Identification and Management of Marine Envenomation in Pediatric Patients read more

Test Your Knowledge: Synthetic Drug Intoxication in Children
February 21, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice Blog Brain Teaser

The continually changing chemical formulations of synthetic drugs makes recognition and diagnosis of intoxication from these substances challenging. When children and adolescents present to the emergency department with agitation or mental status changes, intoxication from synthetic drug use should be in the differential diagnosis. Identifying the responsible compound(s) may be difficult, so asking the patient broad questions and utilizing appropriate diagnostic studies, when indicated, will aid in making the diagnosis and help identify more-serious complications. read more

Treatment Pathway for the Management of a Pediatric Patient With Hypothermia
January 17, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

Hypothermia occurs when the core body temperature falls below 35ºC (95ºF) due to primary exposure (eg, environmental exposure) or secondary to other pathologies. Infants, children, and adolescents are at higher risk for primary cold injuries due to a combination of physiologic and cognitive factors, but quick rewarming and appropriate disposition can result in survival and improved neurological outcomes. Treatment for cold injuries is guided by severity and can include passive or active measures.

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of patients who preset with hypothermia. Download now

Treatment Pathway for the Management of a Pediatric Patient With HypothermiaTreatment Pathway for the Management of a Pediatric Patient With Hypothermia

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Christmas Is The Busiest Air Travel Season. Would You Be Ready In An Emergency Happened Mid-Flight?
December 10, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

A Common Occurrence

More than 4 billion passengers are expected to fly in 2019, and more than 60,000 medical emergencies are expected to occur during commercial flights.1 Emergency clinicians who work with acutely ill patients may have had the experience of boarding an aircraft and wondering what they would do if a medical emergency occurred.

“Should I respond?”

“What kinds of medications and equipment are aboard?”

“Would I be legally protected if something went wrong?”

These questions can be paralyzing and prevent otherwise highly trained medical personnel from delivering life-saving care.

Lifelong Learning, Applied

Megan Carman, NP, encountered one of those 60,000+ inflight medical emergencies just last month. She used the Emergency Medicine Practice issue, “Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies: Responsibilities and Pitfalls” to familiarize herself with the roles, equipment, and protections available if called upon to respond to an in-flight medical emergency. Little did she know, Carman would be putting that knowledge to use shortly thereafter.

“How helpful that inflight emergency module was! Right after I read it, I was on a flight and a passenger started seizing. I knew to ask for the drugs and which ones they would have and to ask for IV supplies, and when people got upset about why we weren’t going to land, I told them it was a pilot decision and the average cost of landing. Also, when an anesthesiologist, who was also on the plane, was hesitant to help, I was able to tell him there are specific protections for medical providers who assist on planes as long as you are not grossly negligent or acting out of scope… Thank you for all this great info!” -Megan Carman, NP

Carman and many other Emergency Medicine Practice subscribers have specifically noted that they would be more likely to volunteer to assist with an inflight medical emergency after reading this issue.

Review This Issue

To review the issue that helped Carman and other Emergency Medicine Practice subscribers have increased confidence when faced with an inflight medical emergency, click here.

Test your knowledge read more

Test Your Knowledge: Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies
November 21, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

As an emergency clinician, you have special expertise in dealing with acute medical conditions, but when an emergency occurs onboard a commercial aircraft and you raise your hand to help, what are the resources and risks in volunteering? Qualified, active, licensed, and sober providers should volunteer to assist in the event of a medical emergency rather than decline out of fear of medicolegal reprisal.

Test your understanding with a question below.

Please enable javascript to answer the question.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: B.

$( ".question21" ).click(function() { //When the question is clicked on. . .
$( this).find("p").toggle( "medium" ); //toggle the child paragraph.
});

Check out the issue on

Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies: Responsibilities and Pitfalls (Ethics CME) read more

Test Your Knowledge: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in the ED
October 3, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is characterized by persistent change in mental status from baseline lasting more than 5 minutes, generally with epileptiform activity seen on EEG monitoring and subtle or no motor abnormalities. NCSE can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the emergency department setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology.

When a patient presents to the ED with new-onset altered mental status or unusual behavior without visible convulsive activity, how can you tell if it is nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

Can you get it right?

Please enable javascript to answer the question.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

$( ".question19" ).click(function() { //When the question is clicked on. . .
$( this).find("p").toggle( "medium" ); //toggle the child paragraph.
});

Check out the issue on Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated (Pharmacology CME) to brush up on the subject.

Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue read more