What’s Your Diagnosis? Managing the HIV-Infected Adult Patient in the Emergency Department
June 23, 2021


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Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

Case Presentation: Managing the HIV-Infected Adult Patient in the Emergency Department read more

Risk Management Pitfalls for Managing HIV-Infected Patients in the Emergency Department
June 14, 2021


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Our recent issue Managing the HIV-Infected Adult Patient in the Emergency Department focuses on emergency department management of HIV patients both with successful disease suppression from long-term therapy as well as the patient with low CD4 counts in the context of lack of engagement with care, nonadherence, or undiagnosed disease. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Management of Pediatric Head and Neck Infections in the Emergency Department
October 20, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 2 comments

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check to see if you got last month’s case on Supraglottic Airway Devices for Pediatric Airway Management in the ED right. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Infective Endocarditis in the ED: Recognition, Diagnosis, and Treatment
August 21, 2020


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Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check to see if you got last month’s case on Supraventricular Tachydysrhythmias in the Emergency Department right. read more

Test Your Knowledge: Acid-Base Disturbances
June 29, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Acid-base disturbances are physiological responses to a wide variety of underlying conditions and critical illnesses. Homeo-stasis of acid-base physiology is complex and interdependent with the function of the lungs, kidneys, and endogenous buffer systems. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Mechanical Ventilation Management in the Emergency Department
June 22, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 1 comment so far

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check to see if you got last month’s case on Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach right. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach
May 29, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , add a comment

Welcome to this month’s What’s Your Diagnosis Challenge!

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case, on Novel 2019 Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19): An Updated Overview for Emergency Clinicians right. read more

Test Your Knowledge: Failure to Thrive
March 24, 2020


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Emergency Medicine Practice Blog Brain Teaser

Failure to thrive (FTT) is a relatively common presentation in the emergency department. Up to 90% of cases of FTT have no identifiable cause and are categorized as nonorganic. Before deciding that FTT is nonorganic, it is imperative to consider and rule out organic causes. Identifying the underlying issues surrounding FTT is essential, as it will likely impact the treatment the patient receives. read more

Risk Management Pitfalls in the Management of Pediatric Patients With Bacterial Meningitis
March 19, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

The presentation of bacterial meningitis can overlap with viral meningitis and other conditions, and emergency clinicians must remain vigilant to avoid delaying treatment for a child with bacterial meningitis. Inflammatory markers, such as procalcitonin, in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid may help distinguish between bacterial meningitis and viral meningitis. Appropriate early antibiotic treatment and management for bacterial meningitis is critical for optimal outcomes. Although debated, corticosteroids should be considered in certain cases. read more

A Systematic Approach Diabetic Hyperglycemic Emergencies
March 17, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , 1 comment so far

Midway through your shift, a 30-year-old man presents in DKA. He is a known type 1 diabetic patient and has an insulin pump that he says has been alarming. He is awake, alert, and his vital signs at triage are as follows: blood pressure, 110/60 mm Hg; heart rate, 121 beats/min; respiratory rate, 26 breaths/min, temperature, 35.6?C (96?F); and oxygen saturation, 100% on room air. His fingerstick glucose level is high, and his venous pH is 7.12. read more