What’s Your Diagnosis? Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach
May 29, 2020


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But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case, on Novel 2019 Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19): An Updated Overview for Emergency Clinicians right. read more

Test Your Knowledge: Failure to Thrive
March 24, 2020


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Emergency Medicine Practice Blog Brain Teaser

Failure to thrive (FTT) is a relatively common presentation in the emergency department. Up to 90% of cases of FTT have no identifiable cause and are categorized as nonorganic. Before deciding that FTT is nonorganic, it is imperative to consider and rule out organic causes. Identifying the underlying issues surrounding FTT is essential, as it will likely impact the treatment the patient receives. read more

A Systematic Approach Diabetic Hyperglycemic Emergencies
March 17, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , 1 comment so far

Midway through your shift, a 30-year-old man presents in DKA. He is a known type 1 diabetic patient and has an insulin pump that he says has been alarming. He is awake, alert, and his vital signs at triage are as follows: blood pressure, 110/60 mm Hg; heart rate, 121 beats/min; respiratory rate, 26 breaths/min, temperature, 35.6°C (96°F); and oxygen saturation, 100% on room air. His fingerstick glucose level is high, and his venous pH is 7.12. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? A 6-Month-Old Boy Who Presents With Poor Weight Gain
March 3, 2020


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Case Presentation: a 6-month-old boy who presents with poor weight gain

Your first patient is a previously healthy, vaccinated 6-month-old boy who presents with poor weight gain. The child has been seen by his primary care provider multiple times within the last several weeks, and the mother is very concerned because he has not shown any improvement. read more

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State
February 18, 2020


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Click to review the Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State

Hyperglycemic emergencies – diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and the hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) – are common presentations in the ED that require swift, specialized management strategies. Uncovering the precipitating event is critical to management, as morbidity and mortality are related more to the trigger than the DKA/HHS itself. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? Ill-appearing and Tachypneic 23-year-old
January 31, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , 2 comments

Case Presentation: Ill-appearing and Tachypneic 23-year-old Midway through your shift, a 23-year-old woman arrives by EMS. She is ill-appearing, tachypneic, and has a distinct odor you recognize as ketones. Her bedside glucose is 680 mg/dL. You suspect DKA, but wonder what led to it.

Test Your Knowledge Management of Patients With Complications of Bariatric Surgery
August 22, 2019


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As bariatric procedures have become more common, more of these patients present to the emergency department postoperatively. The most common complaints in these patients are abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.

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Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Patients With Bariatric Surgery Complications
August 14, 2019


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As bariatric procedures have become more common, more of these patients present to the emergency department postoperatively.

The most common complaints in these patients are abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, though each of the surgical procedures will present with specific complications, and management will vary according to the surgical procedure performed. Computed tomography is often the primary imaging modality, though it has it limits, and plain film imaging is appropriate in some cases.

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of patients with bariatric surgery complications. Download now.

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Patients With Bariatric Surgery Complications

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15-year-old girl presents with irregular periods — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer?
February 26, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , 3 comments

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about treating and managing adolescent gynecologic emergencies.

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Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescent Patients
February 18, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , 1 comment so far

In the emergency department, gynecologic complaints are common presentations for adolescent girls, who may present with abdominal pain, pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, and vaginal bleeding. The differential diagnosis for these presentations is broad, and further complicated by psychosocial factors, confidentiality concerns, and the need to recognize abuse and sexual assault.

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of abnormal uterine bleeding in adolescent patients. Download now.

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescent Patients