What’s Your Diagnosis? Acid-Base Disturbances: An Emergency Department Approach
May 29, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , add a comment

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case, on Novel 2019 Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19): An Updated Overview for Emergency Clinicians right. read more

Test Your Knowledge: Failure to Thrive
March 24, 2020


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Emergency Medicine Practice Blog Brain Teaser

Failure to thrive (FTT) is a relatively common presentation in the emergency department. Up to 90% of cases of FTT have no identifiable cause and are categorized as nonorganic. Before deciding that FTT is nonorganic, it is imperative to consider and rule out organic causes. Identifying the underlying issues surrounding FTT is essential, as it will likely impact the treatment the patient receives. read more

What’s Your Diagnosis? A 6-Month-Old Boy Who Presents With Poor Weight Gain
March 3, 2020


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Case Presentation: a 6-month-old boy who presents with poor weight gain

Your first patient is a previously healthy, vaccinated 6-month-old boy who presents with poor weight gain. The child has been seen by his primary care provider multiple times within the last several weeks, and the mother is very concerned because he has not shown any improvement. read more

Summary of Recommendations for ED Management of the Acute Bronchiolitis in Pediatric Patients
November 7, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

Differentiating bronchiolitis from asthma and reactive airway disease in young children can be challenging, and a rapidly changing clinical presentation can confound accurate assessment of the severity of the illness.

Acute bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in young children that leads to emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Bronchiolitis is a clinical diagnosis, and diagnostic laboratory and radiographic tests play a limited role in most cases. While studies have demonstrated a lack of efficacy for bronchodilators and corticosteroids, more recent studies suggest a potential role for combination therapies and high-flow nasal cannula therapy. Frequent evaluation of patient clinical status including respiratory rate, work of breathing, oxygen saturation, and the ability to take oral fluids are important in determining safe disposition.

This summary of the treatment recommendations for pediatric bronchiolitis, supported by various guidelines provides, a systematic approach to ED assessment of such patients.

Click the image to download as PDF..

Summary of Recommendations for ED Management of the Acute Bronchiolitis in Pediatric Patients

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What’s Your Diagnosis? a 9-month-old infant gasping for air
September 30, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 1 comment so far

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case right, about the 11-year-old boy with acute abdominal pain. Click here to check out the answer! read more

A 2-year-old girl with upper respiratory infection symptoms — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer?
April 18, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about diagnosing and managing pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.

Please enable javascript to answer the question.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: B.

$( ".question11" ).click(function() { //When the question is clicked on. . .
$( this).find("p").toggle( "medium" ); //toggle the child paragraph.
});

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Clinical Pathway for Management of Pediatric Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia
April 15, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

A significant challenge in the management of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia is identifying children who are more likely to have bacterial pneumonia and will benefit from antibiotic therapy while avoiding unnecessary testing and treatment in children who have viral pneumonia.

Worldwide, pneumonia is the most common cause of death in children aged < 5 years. Distinguishing viral from bacterial causes of pneumonia is paramount to providing effective treatment but remains a significant challenge. For patients who can be managed with outpatient treatment, the utility of laboratory tests and radiographic studies, as well as the need for empiric antibiotics, remains questionable.

Clinical Pathway for Management of Pediatric Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of pediatric patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Click here to download yours today. read more