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Quiet morning shift. What do you do? March 8, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : What's Your Diagnosis , 3comments

You are working a quiet morning shift when a patient is brought in after a motor vehicle crash. The patient is hypotensive, and the FAST exam reveals a pericardial effusion. You know that time is of the essence, so you rapidly assess the options and wonder whether a needle pericardiocentesis is the best option…

Case Conclusion:
The patient was triaged directly to the resuscitation unit and the trauma surgery service was immediately available at bedside. Further review of the FAST exam revealed right ventricular collapse, and the initial blood pressure of 80/40 mm Hg was consistent with pericardial tamponade. Two large-bore peripheral IVs were placed, and an ECG revealed sinus tachycardia. A bedside pericardiocentesis was performed under ultrasound guidance and 25 mL of blood was aspirated. Repeat blood pressure was 100/60 mm Hg. Chest and pelvic x-rays were within normal limits. The patient was then emergently transported to the operating room for further management. A thoracotomy was performed and noted a 2.5-mm rupture of the right anterior ventricular wall. The defect was repaired, and the patient had an uneventful recovery.

Would you have done it different? Tell us how you would have handled this case.

Pediatric Hypertension. How would you intervene? March 8, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : What's Your Diagnosis , 2comments

Your string of shifts is almost over when you are called into a room for an infant with respiratory distress. You’ve just seen 4 kids with upper respiratory infections, and you feel confident that this is the scenario. The 4-month-old, who was born at 26 weeks’ gestation, shows mild-to-moderate respiratory distress; however, there has been no viral prodrome. A chest x-ray demonstrates moderate pulmonary edema. Back in the room, you note that her blood pressure is 110/80 mm Hg, and you begin to wonder whether that is high for an infant. What additional testing—if any—is necessary? Do you need to intervene? Is there anything specific you should be worried about?

Case Conclusion:
The 4-month-old girl had clear evidence of cardiac failure and hypertension. She was started on an esmolol drip that was slowly titrated, and given a dose of furosemide. Her work of breathing slowly improved, and she was admitted to the intensive care unit, where it was learned that she had had an umbilical arterial line and had a renal artery thrombosis.

Would you have done it different? Tell us how you would have handled this case.

15-year-old girl presents with irregular periods — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer? February 26, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 3comments

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about treating and managing adolescent gynecologic emergencies.


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.

Earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue. 

A 25 weeks’ pregnant patient presents with a blood pressure of 180/120 mm Hg. — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer? February 24, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 2comments

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about treating and managing life-threatening headaches in the ED.

survey services


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: B.

Earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue. 

 

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescent Patients February 18, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Feature Update , 1 comment so far

In the emergency department, gynecologic complaints are common presentations for adolescent girls, who may present with abdominal pain, pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, and vaginal bleeding. The differential diagnosis for these presentations is broad, and further complicated by psychosocial factors, confidentiality concerns, and the need to recognize abuse and sexual assault.

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of abnormal uterine bleeding in adolescent patients. Download now.

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescent Patients

Clinical Pathway for Emergency Department Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage February 17, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Feature Update , 1 comment so far

Headache is the fourth most common reason for emergency department encounters, accounting for 3% of all visits in the United States. Though troublesome, 90% are relatively benign primary headaches –migraine, tension, and cluster headaches. The other 10% are secondary headaches, caused by separate underlying processes, with vascular, infectious, or traumatic etiologies, and they are potentially life-threatening.

This clinical pathway will help you improve care in the management of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Download now.


Adolescent Gynecologic Emergencies. What do you do? February 14, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : What's Your Diagnosis , 1 comment so far

You are then called to the resuscitation room for a 17-year-old girl who was found unresponsive at home. On examination, she is ill-appearing, lethargic, has cool distal extremities, normal heart sounds, and clear lungs, and her abdomen is soft but tender in the left lower quadrant. Her vital signs are: blood pressure, 80/40 mm Hg; heart rate, 130 beats/min; respiratory rate, 25 breaths/min; and oxygen saturation, 95% on room air. What are the immediate first steps in managing this patient? What testing is needed for evaluation and management? What is the appropriate disposition?

Case Conclusion:
The 17-year-old girl presented in shock. IV access was obtained quickly for fluid resuscitation. Bedside abdominal ultrasound revealed free fluid on the suprapubic view. The following laboratory tests were sent: hCG, CBC, complete metabolic panel, type and screen, and blood culture. Her hCG resulted positive, raising concern for ectopic pregnancy. After she was resuscitated, gynecology was consulted and noted an empty uterus and free peritoneal fluid on ultrasound, in spite of a serum hCG of 10,000 mIU/mL. The patient was quickly transferred to the operating room where an ectopic pregnancy complicated by hemoperitoneum was found.

Would you have done it different? Tell us how you would have handled this case.

Life-Threatening Headache. What do you do? February 12, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : What's Your Diagnosis , 2comments

A 55-year-old man with history of nonsmall cell lung cancer who is on cisplatin presents with an acute headache and lethargy for 6 hours. His vital signs are remarkable for a blood pressure of 210/120 mm Hg, heart rate of 70 beats/min, and a temperature of 36.7°C (98°F). His physical exam reveals a lethargic patient with no localizing neurologic signs and no meningismus. You order a noncontrast CT of the head and consider lowering this patient’s blood pressure, though you wonder how much and how fast it should be reduced…

Case Conclusion:
You recognize that this cancer patient’s change in mental status and severely elevated blood pressure was likely the result of PRES. You obtained a CT of the head, which revealed white-matter changes in the posterior cerebral hemispheres. Utilizing IV nicardipine, you lowered the patient’s MAP by 25% over the first hour. In addition, you temporarily discontinued his chemotherapy medication. He subsequently became more alert and responsive.

Would you have done it different? Tell us how you would have handled this case.

Secondary hypothermia in patients with sepsis and trauma — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer? January 26, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about treating and managing hypothermia and peripheral cold Injuries in pediatric patients.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: C.

Earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue. 

Using anti-D immune globulin in first trimest of pregnancy — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer? January 24, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about treating and managing first trimester pregnancies in the ED.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue. 

 

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Last Modified: 04-20-2019
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