Christmas Is The Busiest Air Travel Season. Would You Be Ready In An Emergency Happened Mid-Flight? December 10, 2019


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A Common Occurrence

More than 4 billion passengers are expected to fly in 2019, and more than 60,000 medical emergencies are expected to occur during commercial flights.1 Emergency clinicians who work with acutely ill patients may have had the experience of boarding an aircraft and wondering what they would do if a medical emergency occurred.

“Should I respond?”

“What kinds of medications and equipment are aboard?”

“Would I be legally protected if something went wrong?”

These questions can be paralyzing and prevent otherwise highly trained medical personnel from delivering life-saving care.

Lifelong Learning, Applied

Megan Carman, NP, encountered one of those 60,000+ inflight medical emergencies just last month. She used the Emergency Medicine Practice issue, “Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies: Responsibilities and Pitfalls” to familiarize herself with the roles, equipment, and protections available if called upon to respond to an in-flight medical emergency. Little did she know, Carman would be putting that knowledge to use shortly thereafter.

“How helpful that inflight emergency module was! Right after I read it, I was on a flight and a passenger started seizing. I knew to ask for the drugs and which ones they would have and to ask for IV supplies, and when people got upset about why we weren’t going to land, I told them it was a pilot decision and the average cost of landing. Also, when an anesthesiologist, who was also on the plane, was hesitant to help, I was able to tell him there are specific protections for medical providers who assist on planes as long as you are not grossly negligent or acting out of scope… Thank you for all this great info!” -Megan Carman, NP

Carman and many other Emergency Medicine Practice subscribers have specifically noted that they would be more likely to volunteer to assist with an inflight medical emergency after reading this issue.

Review This Issue

To review the issue that helped Carman and other Emergency Medicine Practice subscribers have increased confidence when faced with an inflight medical emergency, click here.

Test your knowledge


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The correct answer: B.

1. Peterson DC, Martin-Gill C, Guyette FX, et al. Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights. N Engl J Med. 2013;368(22):2075-2083. (Retrospective review; 11,920 in-flight medical emergencies)

Test Your Knowledge: Pediatric Stroke: Diagnosis and Management in the ED November 21, 2019


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Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The etiologies, risk factors, and presentation of stroke differ from those of adults, and the diagnosis of stroke is often delayed in children. The management of pediatric stroke can be challenging because there are few data to support the efficacy of interventions.

Test your knowledge and see if you’d spot stroke in a pediatric patient!


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The correct answer: B.


Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on the most common causes of pediatric stroke, provides guidance for distinguishing stroke from stroke mimics, discusses the indications for diagnostic studies, and offers evidence-based recommendations for treatment in the emergency department.

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Test Your Knowledge: Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies November 21, 2019


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As an emergency clinician, you have special expertise in dealing with acute medical conditions, but when an emergency occurs onboard a commercial aircraft and you raise your hand to help, what are the resources and risks in volunteering? Qualified, active, licensed, and sober providers should volunteer to assist in the event of a medical emergency rather than decline out of fear of medicolegal reprisal.

Test your understanding with a question below.


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The correct answer: B.

Check out the issue on Assisting With Air Travel Medical Emergencies: Responsibilities and Pitfalls (Ethics CME) to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue

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5 Tips to Improve Clinical Efficiency November 7, 2019


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We’ve all heard the saying, “time is money!”

As your day of delivering emergency care gets more complex, it’s critical to operate with clinical efficiency. While there is a myriad of ways to improve clinical efficiency, our team at EB Medicine has selected their five favorite tips and compiled them into a helpful infographic you can feel free to share with your team.

EB Medicine helps practices just like yours save time, improve patient care, and stay confidently up to date. We’d love to hear about your unique needs and share how we feel EB Medicine can meet them. So do not hesitate to reach out to Dana (contact info included below) with any questions.

5 Tips to Improve Clinical Efficiency

Dana Stenzel
Account Executive, EB Medicine
Email: Danas@ebmedicine.net
Direct: 678-336-8466 x 120
www.linkedin.com/in/dana-stenzel

How Will Your ED Fare This Halloween? Management of Anaphylaxis in Pediatric Patients October 20, 2019


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Anaphylaxis is a time-sensitive, clinical diagnosis that is often misdiagnosed because the presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those of other disease processes. Many cases of anaphylaxis are misdiagnosed or undertreated. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis are similar to other common illnesses, which can make diagnosis challenging. Atypical anaphylaxis can be even more difficult to diagnose, because some of the typical signs of anaphylaxis are not present.

Test your knowledge and see if you’d recognize a pediatric patient with anaphylaxis!


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The correct answer: A.

Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on management of anaphylaxis in pediatric patients in the ED.

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Test Your Knowledge: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in the ED October 3, 2019


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Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is characterized by persistent change in mental status from baseline lasting more than 5 minutes, generally with epileptiform activity seen on EEG monitoring and subtle or no motor abnormalities. NCSE can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the emergency department setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology.

When a patient presents to the ED with new-onset altered mental status or unusual behavior without visible convulsive activity, how can you tell if it is nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

Can you get it right?


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The correct answer: D.

Check out the issue on Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated (Pharmacology CME) to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: Signs of pneumothorax when seen on thoracic ultrasound September 13, 2019


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The pediatric patient is arguably more suited for emergency ultrasound than the adult patient. Children generally have a smaller body habitus than adults and, therefore, less tissue for the ultrasound beams to penetrate. This often leads to clearer images of the different organ systems, which should yield better diagnostic accuracy.

Test your knowledge and see how much you know on pediatric ultrasound!


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The correct answer: D.

Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on POCUS in the ED.

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Test Your Knowledge: Concussion in the ED September 10, 2019


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An increasing number of patients with concussive injuries are presenting to the ED, due to a combination of factors, including media attention to sport-related concussion, early dedication to competitive sport, and improved screening and diagnostic tools for concussion.

Emergency clinicians play an important role in diagnosing concussion, initiating treatment, and providing concussion education to patients and their caregivers to optimize recovery.

Can you get it right?


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Check out the issue on Concussion in the Emergency Department: A Review of Current Guidelines to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: When should ketorolac be avoided? August 22, 2019


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Test your knowledge and see how much you know about pediatric pain management in the emergency department.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: C.


Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on guidance on assessing pain in pediatric patients and provides evidence-based recommendations for developing strategies to successfully manage pain in pediatric patients.

Test Your Knowledge Management of Patients With Complications of Bariatric Surgery August 22, 2019


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As bariatric procedures have become more common, more of these patients present to the emergency department postoperatively. The most common complaints in these patients are abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.


Check out the issue on Emergency Department Management of Patients With Complications of Bariatric Surgery to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.