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How Will Your ED Fare This Halloween? Management of Anaphylaxis in Pediatric Patients October 20, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

Anaphylaxis is a time-sensitive, clinical diagnosis that is often misdiagnosed because the presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those of other disease processes. Many cases of anaphylaxis are misdiagnosed or undertreated. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis are similar to other common illnesses, which can make diagnosis challenging. Atypical anaphylaxis can be even more difficult to diagnose, because some of the typical signs of anaphylaxis are not present.

Test your knowledge and see if you’d recognize a pediatric patient with anaphylaxis!


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.

Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on management of anaphylaxis in pediatric patients in the ED.

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Test Your Knowledge: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in the ED October 3, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is characterized by persistent change in mental status from baseline lasting more than 5 minutes, generally with epileptiform activity seen on EEG monitoring and subtle or no motor abnormalities. NCSE can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the emergency department setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology.

When a patient presents to the ED with new-onset altered mental status or unusual behavior without visible convulsive activity, how can you tell if it is nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

Can you get it right?


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Check out the issue on Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated (Pharmacology CME) to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: Signs of pneumothorax when seen on thoracic ultrasound September 13, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

The pediatric patient is arguably more suited for emergency ultrasound than the adult patient. Children generally have a smaller body habitus than adults and, therefore, less tissue for the ultrasound beams to penetrate. This often leads to clearer images of the different organ systems, which should yield better diagnostic accuracy.

Test your knowledge and see how much you know on pediatric ultrasound!


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on POCUS in the ED.

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Test Your Knowledge: Concussion in the ED September 10, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

An increasing number of patients with concussive injuries are presenting to the ED, due to a combination of factors, including media attention to sport-related concussion, early dedication to competitive sport, and improved screening and diagnostic tools for concussion.

Emergency clinicians play an important role in diagnosing concussion, initiating treatment, and providing concussion education to patients and their caregivers to optimize recovery.

Can you get it right?


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Check out the issue on Concussion in the Emergency Department: A Review of Current Guidelines to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: When should ketorolac be avoided? August 22, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about pediatric pain management in the emergency department.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: C.


Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on guidance on assessing pain in pediatric patients and provides evidence-based recommendations for developing strategies to successfully manage pain in pediatric patients.

Test Your Knowledge Management of Patients With Complications of Bariatric Surgery August 22, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

As bariatric procedures have become more common, more of these patients present to the emergency department postoperatively. The most common complaints in these patients are abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.


Check out the issue on Emergency Department Management of Patients With Complications of Bariatric Surgery to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: What is the appropriate management of this infant? July 17, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about management and treatment of young infants presenting with fever.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: C.


Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on novel diagnostic tools such as procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, and RNA biosignatures as well as new risk stratification tools such as the Step-by-Step approach and the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network prediction rule to determine which febrile young infants require a full sepsis workup and to guide the management of these patients in the emergency department.

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Test Your Knowledge on Assessing Abdominal Pain July 17, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Patients with abdominal pain are common in the ED, but you need a strategy for quickly identifying patients who are at high risk for life-threatening causes of pain.

The management of abdominal pain has changed significantly in the past 20 years, with increasing emphasis on identifying patients who are at high risk for occult pathology and worse outcomes. Test your knowledge of the most common causes of sudden-onset abdominal pain.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.

Check out the issue on Assessing Abdominal Pain in Adults: A Rational, Cost-Effective, and Evidence-Based Strategy to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

Brain Teaser: Do you know which of the following patients meets the criteria for anaphylaxis? June 24, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , add a comment

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis in pediatric patients.

Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.

Earn CME for this topic by logging to take your CME test.

A 2-year-old girl with upper respiratory infection symptoms — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer? April 18, 2019

Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in : Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about diagnosing and managing pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: B.

Earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

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Last Modified: 10-23-2019
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