How Will Your ED Fare This Halloween? Management of Anaphylaxis in Pediatric Patients
October 20, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Anaphylaxis is a time-sensitive, clinical diagnosis that is often misdiagnosed because the presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those of other disease processes. Many cases of anaphylaxis are misdiagnosed or undertreated. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis are similar to other common illnesses, which can make diagnosis challenging. Atypical anaphylaxis can be even more difficult to diagnose, because some of the typical signs of anaphylaxis are not present. read more

Right for Halloween: Clinical Algorithm for Pediatric Patients with Multiple Injuries
October 10, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

When children with multiple serious injuries present to the ED, how do you ensure that you identify and address all of their injuries?

Management of the child with multiple traumatic injuries can be challenging, and important injuries may not be readily recognized. Early recognition of serious injuries, initiation of appropriate diagnostic studies, and rapid stabilization of injuries are key to decreasing morbidity and mortality in the multiply injured pediatric trauma patient. The differential diagnosis for these patients is wide, and treatment is targeted to the specific injuries. read more

Concussion Aftercare Guidelines for the ED
October 10, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

One important aspect of concussion management for the emergency clinician is the provision of adequate aftercare instructions at the time of discharge from the ED. This requires a paradigm shift for the emergency clinician, as discharging a head-injured patient was primarily focused on providing precautions for potential deterioration. read more

Test Your Knowledge: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in the ED
October 3, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is characterized by persistent change in mental status from baseline lasting more than 5 minutes, generally with epileptiform activity seen on EEG monitoring and subtle or no motor abnormalities. NCSE can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the emergency department setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology. read more