How geriatric physiology impacts clinical care
April 30, 2019


Posted by Robin Wilkinson in: Uncategorized , add a comment

Just as “children are not little adults,” the physiologic and behavioral differences of the elderly demand that emergency clinicians manage illness in the elderly differently than we do in younger adults. In fact, two central medical principles used for children can be applied to the elderly: Patients are more vulnerable, and symptoms are much less specific. read more

A 2-year-old girl with upper respiratory infection symptoms — Brain Teaser. Do you know the answer?
April 18, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , 1 comment so far

Test your knowledge and see how much you know about diagnosing and managing pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.


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Trauma Awareness Month Is Almost Here – Test Your Knowledge with Genitourinary Trauma Question
April 18, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

A patient suffering blunt abdominal trauma complains of suprapubic pain and has gross hematuria. Initial CT of the abdomen and pelvis with IV contrast is normal. Do yo know the answer? read more

Clinical Pathway for Management of Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the Emergency Department
April 15, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

Sexually transmitted disease can cause severe outcomes for patients, their partners, and their unborn babies, and swift and accurate diagnosis and treatment is essential to reduce morbidity and minimize the potential public health risks. read more

Clinical Pathway for Management of Pediatric Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia
April 15, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

A significant challenge in the management of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia is identifying children who are more likely to have bacterial pneumonia and will benefit from antibiotic therapy while avoiding unnecessary testing and treatment in children who have viral pneumonia. read more

Do you need to do anything regarding the missing fragment? — ED Management of Dental Trauma in Pediatric Patients
April 11, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , add a comment

Case Recap:
Your first patient of the day is a 2-year-old girl who tripped and fell while walking, hitting her mouth on the concrete sidewalk. On your examination, her left central incisor tooth appears to be fractured, with a yellow dot visible inside the tooth. The tooth is nontender and nonmobile. The parents don’t have the other part of the tooth and think it fell onto the street. You start to consider: How do you determine what kind of fracture this is and how serious it is? How does management differ between primary teeth versus permanent teeth, and how can you tell if this is a primary tooth or a permanent tooth? Do you need to do anything regarding the missing fragment? read more

Should you give antivenom again? — ED Management of North American Snake Envenomations
April 11, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 2 comments

Case Recap:
A 26-year-old man arrives to the ED via private vehicle with his arm in a makeshift sling. He reports that his pet rattlesnake bit him on his right index finger about 45 minutes ago. His hand and wrist are swollen. He reports that he has no past medical history besides his 3 previous visits for snakebites. He reports having a “reaction” to the snakebite antidote during his last visit. You wonder whether the patient is immune . . . or should you give antivenom again? read more