Summary of Recommendations for ED Management of the Acute Bronchiolitis in Pediatric Patients November 7, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

Differentiating bronchiolitis from asthma and reactive airway disease in young children can be challenging, and a rapidly changing clinical presentation can confound accurate assessment of the severity of the illness.

Acute bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in young children that leads to emergency department visits and hospitalizations. Bronchiolitis is a clinical diagnosis, and diagnostic laboratory and radiographic tests play a limited role in most cases. While studies have demonstrated a lack of efficacy for bronchodilators and corticosteroids, more recent studies suggest a potential role for combination therapies and high-flow nasal cannula therapy. Frequent evaluation of patient clinical status including respiratory rate, work of breathing, oxygen saturation, and the ability to take oral fluids are important in determining safe disposition.

This summary of the treatment recommendations for pediatric bronchiolitis, supported by various guidelines provides, a systematic approach to ED assessment of such patients.

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Summary of Recommendations for ED Management of the Acute Bronchiolitis in Pediatric Patients

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Right for the Season: Clinical Flowchart for Management of Burns in the Emergency Department November 7, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

Holidays are busy times for everyone, including emergency departments. Maybe it’s the rushing around during preparation or too many people in the kitchen, but inevitably someone gets hurt and burns are among the top injuries seen in the ED during the Thanksgiving holidays.

Thermal burn injuries are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to treatment of the burns, emergency clinicians must assess for inhalation injury, exposure to toxic gases, and related traumatic injuries.

Priorities for emergency resuscitation include stabilization of airway and breathing, intravenous fluid administration, pain control, and local wound care. Special populations, including children and pregnant women, require additional treatment considerations. Referral to specialized burn care for select patients is necessary to improve long-term outcomes.

This pathway outlines evidence-based treatment strategies for treating thermal burn injuries in the ED.

Clinical Pathway for Management of Burns in the Emergency Department

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5 Tips to Improve Clinical Efficiency November 7, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

We’ve all heard the saying, “time is money!”

As your day of delivering emergency care gets more complex, it’s critical to operate with clinical efficiency. While there is a myriad of ways to improve clinical efficiency, our team at EB Medicine has selected their five favorite tips and compiled them into a helpful infographic you can feel free to share with your team.

EB Medicine helps practices just like yours save time, improve patient care, and stay confidently up to date. We’d love to hear about your unique needs and share how we feel EB Medicine can meet them. So do not hesitate to reach out to Dana (contact info included below) with any questions.

5 Tips to Improve Clinical Efficiency

Dana Stenzel
Account Executive, EB Medicine
Email: Danas@ebmedicine.net
Direct: 678-336-8466 x 120
www.linkedin.com/in/dana-stenzel

What’s Your Diagnosis? a 7-year-old boy after a generalized seizure lasting 2 minutes November 1, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 4 comments

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case right, about the 9-month-old infant gasping for air. Click here to check out the answer!

Case Presentation: a 7-year-old boy after a generalized seizure lasting 2 minutes

A 7-year-old boy is brought in by ambulance after a witnessed generalized seizure lasting 2 minutes at home. He has no history of prior seizures. Upon arrival to the ED, he appears postictal and is moving all of his extremities. His blood glucose is 110 mg/dL. His vital signs are: temperature, 36.9°C (98.5°F); heart rate, 60 beats/min; blood pressure, 110/70 mm Hg; respiratory rate, 14 breaths/min; and oxygen saturation, 98% on room air. The boy vomits while the nurse is trying to obtain IV access.

Per the mother, the boy has been receiving chemotherapy for lymphoma and was complaining of a headache earlier in the day. He has no history of intrathecal chemotherapy. The mother does not think he had any head trauma recently.

You know that the child needs brain imaging, but you are uncertain which imaging would be most useful…

Leave your solution in the comments below and review the issue to find out what was the authors’ recommendation.

Not a subscriber? You can find out the conclusion and if you got it right, next month when a new case is posted, so stay tuned!

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What’s Your Diagnosis? Pain Management: Beyond Opioids November 1, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 3 comments

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case, on nonconvulsive status epilepticus, right. Click here to check out the answer!

Case Presentation: A 73-year-old woman in the ED after “twisting” her ankle

A 73-year-old woman with a history of peptic ulcer disease and stage 3 chronic kidney disease presents to the ED after “twisting” her ankle. She tried acetaminophen at home, but it didn’t adequately alleviate her pain. Currently, she complains of 6/10 pain at rest. She has mild swelling and tenderness at the posterior edge of her lateral malleolus. You order an ankle x-ray to evaluate for fracture and consider giving her oxycodone…

You wonder whether there is a better and safer alternative…

Leave your solution in the comments below and review the issue to find out what was the authors’ recommendation.

Not a subscriber? You can find out the conclusion and if you got it right, next month when a new case is posted, so stay tuned!

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How Will Your ED Fare This Halloween? Management of Anaphylaxis in Pediatric Patients October 20, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Anaphylaxis is a time-sensitive, clinical diagnosis that is often misdiagnosed because the presenting signs and symptoms are similar to those of other disease processes. Many cases of anaphylaxis are misdiagnosed or undertreated. The signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis are similar to other common illnesses, which can make diagnosis challenging. Atypical anaphylaxis can be even more difficult to diagnose, because some of the typical signs of anaphylaxis are not present.

Test your knowledge and see if you’d recognize a pediatric patient with anaphylaxis!


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: A.

Review this Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice issue to get up-to-date on management of anaphylaxis in pediatric patients in the ED.

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Right for Halloween: Clinical Algorithm for Pediatric Patients with Multiple Injuries October 10, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

When children with multiple serious injuries present to the ED, how do you ensure that you identify and address all of their injuries?

Management of the child with multiple traumatic injuries can be challenging, and important injuries may not be readily recognized. Early recognition of serious injuries, initiation of appropriate diagnostic studies, and rapid stabilization of injuries are key to decreasing morbidity and mortality in the multiply injured pediatric trauma patient. The differential diagnosis for these patients is wide, and treatment is targeted to the specific injuries.

This clinical flowchart provides a systematic approach to the management of pediatric patients with multiple traumatic injuries. Download now.

Clinical Pathway for the Management of a Pediatric Patient With Multiple Traumatic Injuries

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Concussion Aftercare Guidelines for the ED October 10, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Feature Update , add a comment

One important aspect of concussion management for the emergency clinician is the provision of adequate aftercare instructions at the time of discharge from the ED. This requires a paradigm shift for the emergency clinician, as discharging a head-injured patient was primarily focused on providing precautions for potential deterioration.

Patients with severe symptoms may be concerned about their ability to recover and the long-term implications, due to heightened media attention on concussion. An understanding of the expected course of recovery can be very helpful to the patient and family, providing reassurance that the majority of patients with concussion will recover fully.

Instructions for aftercare may include a period of rest, but should allow for limited, progressive cognitive and physical activity as tolerated by the patient and as symptoms improve. Emergency clinicians should not create disability by recommending strict rest. Several studies have found no benefit in the prescription of strict rest when compared to the resumption of moderate cognitive or physical activity. Brown et al demonstrated improved recovery in children who were provided with moderate cognitive rest compared to no cognitive rest, but there was no additional benefit with extremes of cognitive rest. It has also been shown that patients who resumed moderate levels of cognitive or physical activity recovered better than those with strict rest or resumption of high levels of activity.

While strict rest may inhibit recovery, the discussion with the patient must be balanced by maintaining a healthy respect for the vulnerability of the concussed brain. Rodent studies have clearly demonstrated that there is a window of vulnerability after a concussion, during which even a mild repeat injury significantly increases the risk of a complicated recovery. MRI spectroscopy studies in humans have demonstrated neurometabolic changes that persist beyond apparent clinical resolution of the concussion, but the clinical implications of these findings are not yet clear. Patients should be counseled on the risks of re-injury and should not return to sport or high-risk physical activities, such as bike riding, until cleared from the concussion during a follow-up medical visit.

When providing aftercare instructions, the emergency clinician should advise patients and caregivers that return to school is appropriate once severe symptoms have improved. Return to school typically can take place within 48 to 72 hours after the injury. Academic adjustments may be needed to support recovery in the school environment. The primary care clinician or concussion specialist is more suited than the emergency clinician to work with the patient’s school on specific plans for return to school. It is not necessary to keep students out of school until they are symptom free, as doing so increases the risk for development of social isolation, stress from missed school work, and/or school avoidance behaviors.

Sleep disturbance is almost universal in concussion and can be a significant source of disability and delayed recovery. The emergency clinician should counsel patients on sleep hygiene to help prevent a disturbed sleep cycle, as patients may spend more time than normal sleeping during the early course of recovery. Approximately 1 to 2 weeks after the injury, increased sleep often gives way to day-night reversal, difficulty falling asleep, and difficulty staying asleep.

Patients should be advised to eliminate napping within a few days after the injury and should be counseled that proper sleep hygiene techniques should be implemented within a week of the injury. The burden of electronic device use by patients should not be underestimated, as this can contribute to sleep disturbance even without concussion. Constant audible alerts and emission of blue light from electronic devices can contribute to sleep disturbance. Proper sleep hygiene techniques are outlined in Table 7.

Table 7. Proper Sleep Hygiene Techniques

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Test Your Knowledge: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in the ED October 3, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: Brain Tease , add a comment

Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is characterized by persistent change in mental status from baseline lasting more than 5 minutes, generally with epileptiform activity seen on EEG monitoring and subtle or no motor abnormalities. NCSE can be a difficult diagnosis to make in the emergency department setting, but the key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion coupled with rapid initiation of continuous EEG and early involvement of neurology.

When a patient presents to the ED with new-onset altered mental status or unusual behavior without visible convulsive activity, how can you tell if it is nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

Can you get it right?


Did you get it right? Click here to find out!

The correct answer: D.

Check out the issue on Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus: Overlooked and Undertreated (Pharmacology CME) to brush up on the subject. Plus earn CME for this topic by purchasing this issue.

What’s Your Diagnosis? a 9-month-old infant gasping for air September 30, 2019


Posted by Andy Jagoda, MD in: What's Your Diagnosis , 1 comment so far

But before we begin, check out if you got last month’s case right, about the 11-year-old boy with acute abdominal pain. Click here to check out the answer!

Case Presentation: an 9-month-old infant gasping for air

As your shift is winding down at 4 AM, a mother brings in her 9-month-old infant, whom she describes as “gasping for air.” The baby has had a runny nose and cough for a few days as well as a low-grade fever, but now he is breathing rapidly and wheezing, with lower intercostal retractions.

The mother states that the infant has had wheezing in the past, and she asks if he might have asthma since “it runs in the family.” She also indicates that in the last 12 hours, he has not taken his usual amount of fluids.

His oxygen saturation level is 87% on room air.

You begin to think… should I treat this as reactive airway disease, asthma, or bronchiolitis? When should I give the patient albuterol, nebulized epinephrine, or oxygen? Does the infant need steroids? You also wonder whether this patient is going to tire and require assisted ventilation or whether there are any other alternatives to intubation.

Case Conclusion

You quickly determined that your patient had severe bronchiolitis, and you knew that aggressive management was required. You placed the patient on pulse oximetry because the infant had wheezed previously, and started a trial of a nebulized bronchodilator with oxygen while closely monitoring his clinical response to treatment. Your patient’s respiratory rate was still in the 70s, with minimal decreases in the work of breathing. His pulse oximetry level was 87% on room air, so you administered supplemental oxygen via HFNC. The patient started to cry without tears, and you noticed his dry mucous membranes, so you administered IV fluids. His respiratory rate was 55 breaths/min with no retractions, and he was able to take his bottle for only a brief period even after the nurse suctioned his nasal secretions. His SpO2 level remained at 90% on room air. You decided to admit the patient because his tachypnea was leading to compromised oral intake and because of his persistent hypoxia, and you kept him on the HFNC in the meantime.

Review the issue to find out more about the authors’ recommendation.

Not a subscriber? You can find out the conclusion and if you got it right, next month when a new case is posted, so stay tuned!

Click to review Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice