EMPOWERING PHYSICIANS WITH EVIDENCE-BASED CONTENT
 

Home > Browse Topics

<< Diagnosis And Management Of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning In The Emergency Department

Introduction

Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is a frequently considered emergency department (ED) diagnosis.1-3 Annual United States (US) ED visits related to CO poisoning are estimated at 50,000 per year.4 It is one of the leading causes of accidental poisoning death in the US, although the majority of fatalities are intentional.3,5,6 Non-specific and highly variable presentations make this a difficult diagnosis, especially if the exposure history is not clear.1

Patients with CO poisoning are at very high risk for morbidity and mortality. Unlike many other disease entities, emergent treatment for this toxin is aimed not only at treating immediate threats to life but also at preventing delayed and sometimes permanent neuropsychological morbidity. Special considerations must be made for populations with preexisting morbid conditions and for pregnant women. Treatment is based on reducing the duration of cellular exposure to the toxin. This can be accomplished by treating the patient with highconcentration oxygen or with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). Deciding which patient requires which treatment falls under the scope of the emergency clinician’s practice.

This issue of Emergency Medicine Practice covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of CO poisoning in both the general population and special populations.

Emergency Stroke Care, Advances and Controversies

 

About EB Medicine:

Products:

Accredited By:

ACCME ACCME
AMA AMA
ACEP ACEP
AAFP AAFP
AOA AOA
AAP AAP

Endorsed By:

AEMAA AEMAA
HONcode HONcode
STM STM

 

Last Modified: 11/23/2017
© EB Medicine