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Emergency Trauma Care: Current Topics And Controversies, Volume II (Trauma CME)
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Emergency Trauma Care: Current Topics And Controversies, Volume II (Trauma CME) - $219.00

Includes 18 Trauma CME Credits!

This 6-chapter resource reviews aspects of emergency trauma care that you manage virtually every day: treating pain in trauma patients, managing geriatric or obese trauma patients, treating sports-related and ballistic trauma, and avoiding risk when managing trauma patients. In addition to our distinguished authors' discussions, we have included pertinent commentaries on each topic from the emergency medical services, research, surgical, legal, economic, and nursing perspectives--in an effort to give a view of all aspects of trauma care.

Included In This Book:

  1. 90 pages of evidence-based content, covering 6 critical topics
  2. 18 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM that are trauma specific
  3. Summarized information to help you keep up with current guidelines and best practices
  4. Treatment recommendations to help you determine the critical actions required when caring for these patients
  5. And much more!

To view a sample of Emergency Trauma Care, click here.

This new edition of Emergency Trauma Care: Current Topics and Controversies covers some of the most timely and pressing concerns for emergency clinicians today. It was edited by Eric Legome, MD, and Lee W. Shockley, MD, MBA, co-editors of the Cambridge University Press textbook Trauma: A Comprehensive Emergency Medicine Approach, who led a team of physician contributors to produce this specialized trauma resource.

“We considered both current events and trends that impact care in the ED, including increasing gun violence, an epidemic of obesity, a growing number of geriatric patients susceptible to trauma, and a greater focus on trauma-related pain management as we developed the concept for our next high-impact CME offering,” says Dr. Legome. “These serious public health problems grab headlines, and emergency physicians are on the frontline every single day in caring for these unique patients populations.” Other chapters address common but critical sports injuries and the ever-present medical legal concerns.

The 6 topics covered in this volume address some of the most pressing concerns for emergency clinicians:

Chapter 1: Acute Pain In Trauma: Effective Management Techniques: Prompt, effective pain management after a patient sustains acute trauma reduces the negative physiologic and psychological consequences of trauma. This chapter provides a guide to the practical application of multimodal analgesia for the trauma patient in the ED. 

Chapter 2: Ballistic Trauma: A Primer For The Emergency Clinician: This chapter provides the knowledge of the physics, pathophysiology, and treatment of ballistic injuries in order to improve clinical care and decrease medical legal risk.

Chapter 3: Sports Injury Trauma: Management Of New Injuries And Overuse Syndromes: This chapter reviews the most frequently encountered sports injuries, concentrating on overuse syndromes, as well as new-injury patterns that may be found in the acute setting. After reading this chapter, emergency clinicians will be familiar with common sports-related syndromes and be able to differentiate these conditions from the more critical injuries associated with sports.

Chapter 4: Geriatric Trauma: Comprehensive Assessment And Care: Elderly patients are at greater risk for adverse outcomes and are more likely to suffer long-term functional decline than their younger counterparts. This chapter enables clinicians to apply best practices in the management of this population.

Chapter 5: Obese Trauma Patients: Taking A Different Approach To Patient Care: This chapter provides an understanding of the effects of obesity on physiology and how this affects patient care in this population.

Chapter 6: Trauma Malpractice: Steps To Mitigating Risk: This chapter covers the basics of medical legal liability and highlights areas of particular relevance in trauma cases. In addition, liability for on-call physicians, such as trauma surgeons and neurosurgeons, including liability under EMTALA, will be covered.

Are there multiple clinicians at your institution who need trauma CME? We offer excellent group rates on our resources. Simply click here to learn more

Publication Information

Price: $219

Publication Date: October 1, 2016

CME Expiration Date: October 1, 2019

CME: This enduring material includes 18 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. (Trauma CME)

Editors

Eric Legome, MD, Chief of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center, Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, State University of New York Downstate College of Medicine

Lee W. Shockley, MD, MBA, Emergency Physician, CarePoint PC and Rose Medical Center

Authors

Jonathan Apfelbaum, MD, EMS Medical Director, Centura Health Prehospital Emergency Services, Parker Adventist Hospital

Moira Davenport, MD, Associate Professor, Temple University College of Medicine, Associate Residency Director, Allegheny General Hospital

Andrew Herring, MD, Director, Addiction and Pain Management, Associate Director of Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Highland Hospital-Alameda Health System, Oakland, CA, Instructor, University of California - San Francisco

David A. Peak, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Mark Piehl, MD, New York Presbyterian Hospital Columbia & Cornell Universities

Jennifer L. Stankus, MD, JD, FACEP, Attending Contract Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madigan Army Medical Center

Michael Stern, MD, Chief, Geriatric Emergency Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in Emergency Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center

Timothy Titchner, MD, Sports Medicine Fellow, Allegheny General Hospital

Peer Reviewer: Ashika Jain, MD, Assistant Professor, Trauma Critical Care, Emergency Ultrasound, Department of EM, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital Center

Commentaries

 Leon Boudourakis, MD, MHS, Assistant Professor of Surgery, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital Center

Ethan S. Brandler, MD, MPH, FACEP, Assistant Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, Associate Director of Emergency Medical Services, State University of New York at Stony Brook

James Haering, DO, SFHM, Associate Professor of Medicine at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and College of Osteopathic Medicine

Michael Hilton, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Associate Medical Director of EMS and Disaster Preparedness, Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West Hospitals

Germaine Nelson, MSN, MBA, RN, CEN, Senior Associate Director, Emergency Medicine, New York City Health + Hospitals

Tim Schwartz, MD, Director of Acute Care Surgery, Kings County Hospital Center, Assistant Professor of Surgery, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Jennifer L. Stankus, MD, JD, FACEP, Attending Contract Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madigan Army Medical Center

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Acute Pain In Trauma: Effective Management Techniques

  1. Introduction
  2. The Pain Pathway
    1. Transduction
    2. Transmission
    3. Modulation
    4. Perception
  3. Pain Assessment in Trauma
  4. The Basic Approach to Acute Pain Management
    1. PRICE: Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation
      1. Protection and Rest
      2. Ice
      3. Compression
      4. Elevation
  5. Multimodal Analgesia for Trauma
    1. Mild to Moderate Pain
    2. Moderate to Severe Pain
    3. Severe Pain and Severe Injuries
  6. Analgesics for Acute Traumatic Pain
    1. Acetaminophen
    2. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
    3. Opioids
      1. Close Titration of Opioids
    4. Fentanyl for Acute Pain Control in Trauma
      1. Intravenous Fentanyl
      2. Transmucosal and Intranasal Fentanyl
    5. Why Not Morphine?
    6. Ketamine
      1. Ketamine Analgesia
      2. Unique Considerations for Ketamine Use
    7. Multimodal Adjuncts
      1. Gabapentinoids
      2. Regional Anesthesia
  7. Summary
  8. References (88)
  9. CME Questions (7)
  10. Tables & Figures
    1. Consequences of Untreated or Undertreated Pain
    2. Basic Approach to Treatment of Pain Associated with Traumatic Injury
    3. Outward Expression of Pain
    4. Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale
    5. Multimodal Emergency Analgesia for Trauma
    6. Opioid Analgesics for Acute Trauma
    7. Adverse Effects of Utilizing Opioids
    8. Opioid Titration Dosing
    9. Ketamine Dosing for Analgesia
    10. Types of Regional Anesthesia for Pain Management
    11. Benefits of Regional Anesthesia
    12. Regional Anesthesia for Injuries Commonly Seen in the Emergency Department
  11. Commentaries
    1. Emergency Medical Services
    2. Nursing
    3. Medical-Legal
    4. Surgical

Chapter 2: Ballistic Trauma: A Primer For The Emergency Clinician

  1. Introduction
  2. Epidemiology
  3. Weapons and Ammunition
  4. Ballistic Kinetics
    1. Internal Ballistics
    2. External Ballistics
    3. Terminal Ballistics
      1. Energy Transference
      2. High Velocity Versus Low Velocity
      3. Projectile-Tissue Interaction
      4. Zones of Injury
      5. Secondary Wounding
  5. Evaluation of Gunshot Wounds
    1. Entrance and Exit Wounds
      1. Entrance Wounds
      2. Exit Wounds
  6. Behind-Armor Blunt Trauma
  7. “Less-Lethal” Weapons
  8. Myths and Mistakes
  9. Proper Documentation in the Medical Record
  10. Summary
  11. References (107)
  12. CME Questions (7)
  13. Tables & Figures
    1. Mechanism of Ballistic Missile Wounding
    2. Variables of Projectile Energy Transfer
    3. Ballistic Performance of a Military Rifle Bullet in Air and Through Tissue
    4. Effects of 7.62-mm Jacketed Projectile When Fired Through Ballistic Gelatin
    5. Effects of Unjacketed 7.62-mm High-Speed Projectile When Fired Through Ballistic Gelatin
    6. Gun Velocity Categories
    7. Contact Gunshot Wound
    8. Angled Contact Wound
    9. Near-Contact Gunshot Wound
    10. Angled Near-Contact Wound
    11. Intermediate Gunshot Wound With Tattooing
    12. Distance Gunshot Wound
  14. Commentaries
    1. Emergency Medical Services
    2. Surgical
    3. Medical-Legal

Chapter 3: Sports Injury Trauma: Management Of New Injuries And Overuse Syndromes

  1. Introduction
  2. Epidemiology
  3. Pathophysiology
  4. Overuse Injuries
    1. Medial Epicondyle Apophysitis
    2. Tibial Tubercle Apophysitis
    3. Stress Fractures
  5. Concussion
  6. Cervical Spine Injuries
  7. Shoulder Dislocations
  8. Injury to the Posterolateral Corner of the Knee
  9. Conclusion
  10. References (31)
  11. CME Questions (7)
  12. Tables & Figures
    1. Incidence of Sports-Related Injuries in 2012
    2. Anatomic Area Injured During Sports-Related Activities in 2012
    3. Injuries Seen Per Sport in 2012
    4. Injury Incidence Per Sport Among Patients Aged 25 to 40 Years in 2012
    5. Recommended Pitch Count by Age
    6. Concussion Incidence by Sport
    7. Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Rule
    8. Lift-And-Slide Technique
    9. Helmet Removal Technique
    10. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee Anatomy
    11. Varus Stress Test
    12. External Recurvatum Test
    13. Reverse Pivot-Shift Test
    14. Dial Test
  13. Commentaries
    1. Medical-Legal
    2. ICD-10 and Sports Injuries

Chapter 4: Geriatric Trauma: Comprehensive Assessment And Care

  1. Introduction
  2. Clinical Anatomy and Physiology and Associated Comorbidities
  3. Mechanisms of Injury
  4. Prehospital Care
  5. Initial Evaluation and Management
  6. Secondary Survey
    1. Closed-Head Trauma Evaluation
    2. Anticoagulant Reversal
    3. Spinal Injury Evaluation
    4. Thoracic and Abdominal Evaluation
    5. Musculoskeletal Evaluation
    6. Additional Testing
  7. Disposition
  8. Additional Important Considerations
    1. Complication Prevention
    2. Delirium
    3. Elder Abuse
  9. New Evidence – Triage, Management, and Outcome Prediction
    1. Triage
    2. Management
    3. Outcome Prediction
  10. Research and Prevention
    1. New Technology and Research
    2. Fall Prevention Protocols
  11. Summary
  12. References (143)
  13. CME Questions (7)
  14. Tables & Figures
    1. Anatomic and Physiologic Factors Contributing to Injuries and Adverse Outcomes in Elderly Trauma Patients
  15. Commentaries
    1. Emergency Medical Services
    2. Nursing
    3. Medical-Legal
    4. Surgical

Chapter 5: Obese Trauma Patients: Taking A Different Approach To Patient Care

  1. Introduction
  2. Pathophysiology
    1. Effects of Obesity on the Pulmonary System
    2. Effects of Obesity on the Cardiovascular System
    3. Effects of Obesity on the Gastrointestinal System
    4. Effects of Obesity on the Dermatological System
    5. Effects of Obesity on the Immune System
  3. Prehospital Care
  4. Emergency Department Management
    1. Equipment
    2. Intravenous Access
    3. Airway Management
    4. Skin Assessment
  5. Medications
  6. Specific Injury Patterns
  7. Imaging
    1. Radiographs
    2. Ultrasound
    3. Computed Tomography Scan
    4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    5. Interventional Radiology
  8. Summary
  9. References (106)
  10. CME Questions (7)
  11. Tables & Figures
    1. Specific Equipment for Bariatric Patients
    2. Formulas for Calculating Ideal Body Weight
    3. Medications Best Used With Ideal or Total Body Weight Dosing
  12. Commentaries
    1. Emergency Medical Services
    2. Nursing
    3. Surgical

Chapter 6: Trauma Malpractice: Steps To Mitigating Risk

  1. Introduction
  2. Building a Medical Malpractice Case
  3. Risky Business – The Liability Environment in Trauma
  4. The Most Common Causes of Action
  5. Trends in Payouts
  6. Strategies to Mitigate Risk
  7. Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act Principles
    1. Duties of the On-Call Specialist
    2. When Liability Begins and Ends
    3. Transferring Care to Another Facility
  8. Additional Strategies to Mitigate Risk
    1. Establishing Rapport
    2. Documentation in the Medical Record
  9. Conclusion
  10. References (32)
  11. CME Questions (7)
  12. Tables & Figures
    1. The Most Common Emergency Department Claims
    2. Strategies to Mitigate Risk
  13. Commentaries
    1. Nursing

Product Reviews
Shawn Varney, MD - 11/07/2017
I'll have greater caution with the elderly and obese
Russell McDow, MD - 11/06/2017
I now have great awareness of standards and accepted management and better coordination of care at all levels and communication
Mark Cannis - 08/14/2017
This book helped me have better communication with trauma surgeons and better understanding of issues to discuss with and disclose to patients regarding radiation.
Christopher Spencer, MD, FACEP - 08/10/2017
After this course, I will be more meticulous evaluating a trauma patient in general, with special emphasis on the geriatric patient.
Russell McDow, MD - 07/21/2017
Great text. This increased my awareness of standards and accepted management.
John Tracy, MD - 07/06/2017
This book helped me improve the use of different modalities for pain control in the trauma patient.
Carol Allen, MD - 06/29/2017
"Now I will have better documentation in all trauma cases and better management of elderly and obese patients."

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Last Modified: 11/17/2017
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